Developing What Works Best
BID Learning Network
LearningSharingDeveloping What Works Best BID Learning Network

OUR
BELIEF

Better data,
plus better
decisions
will lead to
better health
outcomes.

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RECOMMENDATIONS
AND LESSONS LEARNED

Collaborating
to improve
data quality
and use.

See the BID Initiative briefs

BID
LEARNING
NETWORK

Celebrating progress
at the BLN Discussion
Meeting.

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OUR
VISION

Countries’
health services
are empowered
by improved
data collection,
quality and use.

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BID INITIATIVE
PHOTOS & VIDEOS

Get an inside
look at BID
in the field
and BLN
meetings.

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News From The
BID Learning Network

Oct 22, 2019

BLN/Gavi Data Quality and Use Collaborative Meeting Reports: Lusaka, 24-26 July 2019

The BID Learning Network (BLN)/Gavi Data Quality and Use (DQU) Collaborative convened a meeting between July 24-26, 2019 in Lusaka, Zambia. It was attended by 25 participants, including immunization data managers from Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Liberia, Malawi, Mozambique, The Gambia, Uganda, and Zambia. This post includes the full meeting reports, including French and English translations.

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Get Involved:
Participate

The BID Learning Network is your network. Get involved and help shape the outcome.

The BLN brings countries together to identify shared problems and test shared solutions that can be applied in a few countries and then deployed at scale in many.

Participate in the discussion

Community
News

Mar 9, 2020

The coronavirus is the first true social-media “infodemic”

On January 19—a week before the Lunar New Year—Tommy Tang left Shenzhen with his girlfriend to visit her family in Wuhan for the holiday. They had heard of the novel coronavirus (now officially known as COVID-19), but as far as they knew, it was localized to a small area. The local government had assured people that it would only affect those who visited a specific food market and contracted it directly from wild animals.

Mar 6, 2020

Harnessing the power of routine data to eliminate malaria

National malaria control programs and their partners face the challenge of identifying and mobilizing limited resources to geographic areas where they will have the greatest impact. Increasing insecticide resistance means current interventions are becoming less effective. New tools that are potentially more effective against insecticide-resistant mosquitoes have been introduced, but their use is hampered by higher prices and limited evidence of their impact and cost-effectiveness.

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